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Wednesday, 2 November 2016

Hide and seek

Three… Two... One... Go!
The chase is on.
I sprint into the forest, smash past trees and bushes, 
and find the ideal spot to hide, 
it's a rather large bush, 
perfect to hide In 
although it pushes against me.
I drop to the ground 
and into the bush. 

One minute passes.
Stay hidden, 
Stay quiet, 
they haven't found me yet, see.

Then the seeker is right there! 
As I lie still, some others come and hide nearby,
If I stay here, I'll probably die.
I get up and hide somewhere else, 
don't want to risk being found in a group. 
Here she is, 
the seeker 
is less than 5 metres away.
Lie still, stay down.

Monday, 10 October 2016

Rubbish findings

 INVESTIGATION: RUBBISH AT SCHOOL 
We read an article about a fleet of research waka which spent two years criss crossing the Pacific ocean, observing rubbish. They noticed that if they found rubbish in the ocean, it usually meant they were getting close to land.  Because of this, we infer that most rubbish in the ocean comes from land. 

We wondered if the rubbish in our playground might have a similar trend.   We decided, before lunch on Wednesday last week, to go and find out. We split the school into 12 sections on a map.  Each section had a group of scientists (us!) to make observations and inferences.

We put a red dot on the map wherever we found a piece of rubbish and collected all the rubbish. After lunch we went back, and noted with a blue dot, any new rubbish found in our area.  We also collected this rubbish.   This is our map, showing where we found rubbish, both times



We also classified the rubbish we found into types of rubbish and displayed this into this graph.  

Our observations and inferences:  
We observed that most of the red dot rubbish (rubbish found before lunch) was caught up in fences, around buildings and in bushes, especially tussock grass. 

We think this might be because the wind has blown rubbish left on the ground by students into the bushes where it has been trapped.  The spikes on the bushes help to trap the rubbish.  Some children might hide their rubbish under buildings at lunchtimes. Some people might be throwing the rubbish over fences too.  Rubbish gets blown from the field into the ditch and can’t be blown out again. 

The rubbish is spread throughout the school unevenly and mainly concentrated around buildings and rubbish bins.
We think this is because the rubbish blows out from the rubbish bins and under buildings. We could stop this by making signs that say ‘close the rubbish bins’ in bold letters or attaching string so that it will open wide enough so that they can put rubbish in the bins but also so it closes.

We think that plastic wrap is attracted to fences because it is light and  the wind carries the it and it gets stuck to the fences and it will easily blow out of  pockets and lunch boxes. 
If you don't put your rubbish in your pockets instead you could put it straight in the bin and that way none of the rubbish will blow away and cause litter, and make our school cleaner.
Maybe the problem might be that there's not enough rubbish bins around the school; by some of the playgrounds, on the field and maybe we could put bins around the playgrounds. That will lower the amount of rubbish in our school.


We noticed that the blue dot rubbish was around the ditch and were the kids sit down for lunch.

The rubbish near the sitting area was mabey from lunch time and were the kids were sitting and the must of just drop their rubbish on the ground and not pick it up. The rubbish in the ditch was maybe from some of the rubbish around the sitting area (like light chip packets, plastic wrap, yogurt containers and snack wrappers) and was blown down to the ditch and trapped in the bushes and sandpits.

There may be some problems with our data. Some of the dots may not be accurate as it would be hard to get the rubbish exactly to scale. Some of the pieces of rubbish may have been missed and not written down therefore we don't have an exact fair test. The only time we looked for rubbish was the 27th July 2016 before and after lunch if we tested the rubbish every day we would have a much fair test.

We noticed that there was more rubbish at the playground before lunch than after lunch. The bigger the playground the more rubbish there is. In most of the playgrounds we found the rubbish next to each other What can we do about it? To solve this problem we can put our rubbish in the bins.

BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!

After we made these observations and inferences, we were left with questions as to why people in our school failed to put their rubbish in the bins! Why does so much end up back around the school after one break time? Maybe it is falling out of people's pockets? Perhaps it's the winds fault? Or maybe the students of Waimairi school are dropping it on purpose?

Since then, we have recorded how rubbish was dropped at morning tea and lunch. Basically, we spied on the school! We, as scientists, have completed an investigation into why rubbish is ending up on the ground. On Thursday the 18th of August, we went out at morning tea and lunchtime to make observations of you all, collecting data to find out how rubbish gets on the ground.

We split up into 12 groups. At morning tea we spread ourselves around the whole school to observe. At lunchtime we spread the 12 groups around the lunch eating areas and observed what happened to the rubbish. 
We have made inferences from our observations and here is what we found:


MORNING TEA 

At morning tea time, Waimairi school dropped 205 pieces of rubbish. That's 2 out of 5 people on average who dropped rubbish. 110 pieces of rubbish were dropped on purpose, which is more than half of the rubbish we observed being dropped. We also saw 46 pieces of rubbish dropped without the person realising that they had dropped it, often as they were walking.We also saw rubbish being dropped from pockets.

The places we found that rubbish had been dropped the most, were the Te Puna block, the walkway down to Ara Atu and the playground behind room 13. We think this might be because people playing in these areas may not understand why it is important to put rubbish in the bin. We also inferred that since there's big bushes at Ara Atu, people think they can hide their rubbish there.

Also, there is no rubbish bin in sight of the playground in these areas, so people lazily drop it instead. We think that most people do this because they think that they can hide it, or can get away with dropping it, even when they know it is wrong. And they do get away with it! Why don't people take a little walk over to the bin to put their rubbish where it belongs? 


LUNCHTIME FINDINGS


At lunchtime, 219 pieces of rubbish were dropped throughout the school JUST during lunch eating time. That's 2 out of every 5 people in the school on average. that is a large amount of people to be dropping rubbish.
From what we saw, 79 pieces of rubbish were dropped on purpose, and 44 were left where people were eating. 

Just like at morning tea time, we think that around the school most of the people drop the rubbish because there's not enough rubbish bins around. Although there are already some bins, there only a few, and sometimes not in the best places. 
We also think that some children might not be able to reach the bins because we observed the bins are quite a bit taller than some junior children. Younger students also may not understand why it is bad to leave rubbish on the ground.

We could maybe get more and smaller bins to show others that bins are valued around the school but we think most of the kids already know about why we shouldn't  drop rubbish - because it will cause lots of problems for the animals in our environment and make our school look messy.

We spotted some differences between Morning Tea and Lunchtime. At lunch-eating time, more pieces of rubbish were dropped than the whole of morning tea time, even though morning tea is longer than lunch eating time. We think that more rubbish was dropped at lunch because more food is eaten at lunchtime and there would be a bigger chance of rubbish flying out of their lunchboxes. Lunch food is also more likely to have wrappers. However we also inferred that people might deliberately litter so that they don’t get in trouble for walking to the bin - as we are not allowed to stand up during lunch eating time.

Under the classroom is also a common place to put rubbish. But the reason  that people drop rubbish there is because they think no one will notice. But we did! But if you think that you get away with it, then you are wrong because we see rubbish everywhere, even in sneaky places where people will think you can't see it.

Overall, 424 pieces of rubbish were dropped in the 45 minutes we were observing that day. That’s almost one piece of rubbish per person. If nobody ever picks this rubbish up, then by the end of the week there would be 2120 pieces of rubbish floating around the school.  Many people dropped their rubbish on purpose, but also accidentally, leaving it where they ate or hiding it.

We think if we all work together our school can be cleaner by just simply walking  to the bin, because just doing a simple thing like that will help to make a big difference. But we also think that during lunch eating time we should be allowed to stand up to walk to the bin to put our rubbish in it. We will be discussing this with the teachers. This means people will be less likely to throw it in the bushes, under the buildings, leave it where they were eating or just throw it on the ground.

We also plan to write to the board of trustees to see if we can have more bins built permanently into the areas that we’ve observed to gather the most rubbish. We also need bins that are the right size for younger kids as well.

So what is the most important thing for you to remember from today? Do not drop rubbish on purpose. It’s pretty simple.  Please walk the few metres to the bins, otherwise we will all be swimming in a pool of rubbish.














Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Overprotective parents by Casper smith

This is the speech that I have worked hard on, I hope you enjoy it and here is a little reflection for my working.
This term I was learning how to express myself and how to make a my point heard, I feel that I did well doing this because in my speech you can hear every word that I say. My speech is well organised showing connections and flow between all important parts of speech structure, all my ideas connect to the point of view and include factual information, and it uses several language devices to persuade and connect with the audience. For example a language device that I used was an imperative. The imperative that I used was, “think back to the time”. I feel that when I presented my speech I did pretty well because I didn't stumble over the words very much.

Please click here to listen to my speech or read it below.



Have you ever been in a situation where your parents don’t let you do something simple, like go to the park, (which for me is a two minute walk away) or maybe walk to school on you own, or even you and your friend not being allowed to go to the playground,
and you think to yourself ‘I'm not five anymore’. Talk about overprotective parents
Well frankly, you shouldn't be just thinking your not five anymore, you should be saying just that. It's about time we start to stand up to our parents, it's time we started to reason, to find strong ideas for convincing your parents, to take control of the actions we should have control over.

Think back to a time on a hot, stuffy summer's day. For me we were in Toraranūi, at the beach. All I could think about was the tall rock sticking out of the sea that we called the rock jump island, just to the left and a hundred metres out, not far from the point. Man I wanted to go there today. So, I went to ask mum.
And mum being mum, said no. She said no! Why'd she say no?
So I went to ask her, “Ohh, why not”
“because I said so” she replied.
Don't you just hate it when your parents say that? It's just so annoying when they give you a fake answer like that. Put your hand up if your parents have said that before?
And I'll be surprised if your hands not up.

This is the kind of thing we need to reason with. The simple, the small, little things that we should be able to do!

What about the time you weren't allowed to walk to school on your own? Come on, next year some of us will be going to intermediate schools like Cobham or Heaton, and will have to go to school on our own. There are just some parents who won't accept the fact that our first day of school was long ago and that on our next time at a new school we will be a lot older and we will be more educated. And how about the time that your younger sibling was sick so you went to ask your parents if you could walk to school but they still said no?
Or maybe you just wanted to walk to school on your own but you're parents said
“No, you're brothers too young, and if you go alone now he will have to walk with me, and that's final”

(In all fairness to my mum that was a long time ago but I'm allowed to walk to school on my own now)

Another thing I have to tell you about is the park - the only place big enough to fly my radio controlled helicopter. And it was a super sunny day, 30 degrees celsius, absolutely no wind. And, to top it of, I was really bored.
So I went to ask mum, and from what I figured, she'd be happy to have me out of the house because me+park=less work for mum, but once again she proved me wrong with one simple word. No. But this time I did reason with her,
“Why not,” I said “it's a beautiful day, And there's no wind so that it is unlikely that it will crash and I'm bored”
“Mm Um, Ok, you can” she said.

If this was the way that (almost) every argument ended, our lives would be way more fun, Don't  you agree? we’ll be able to walk to school on our own, jump of rocks into the sea, go to the park and many more! What we need to do to avoid the no is to make no yes, to reason with our parents. So that next time your parents say no, you'll be ready with your convincing ideas.


Tuesday, 24 May 2016

Stingray writing and reflection

The paddle in the water makes a loud splash, splash, splash. 
I am out on the kayak, exploring the rock that I had only seen during high tide underwater.
Will the octopus be there? Will I fall into the deep water?
I paddle over towards the rock, wondering if there would be any fish. The rock stands jagged out of the water. 
If I put the tip of the kayak on the rock, I will be stuck for ages, and even if I got out of it I would probably sink. Good thing the water was calm.
As I get to the rock, I see a shape I recognise. It stands out like fluorescent yellow on black. A stingray. I turn the kayak, paddling away as if I'm a mouse with cat on its tail.
I turn my head and see the stingray stalking me.
Crap. I paddle quickly towards the shore and look behind me. 
No stingray. 
Phew.




Reflection.
During the making of this story we were learning about many things, these are just a few of them.
One: connecting to an emotion. Every story has to have a main emotion, if it doesn't have one the story will just become boring, but if you want to focus on an emotion you need to describe in-depth, eg. I look up at the tree, I am scared, see? Boring. But when you describe it in-depth it's more interesting,  eg. I stare up at the tree, petrified of its incredible heights. 
See? More interesting. Another thing we learnt about was past and present tense, always write in one tense unless you are putting a flashback in.
I think that this writing is at multistructural because I have listed many ideas and they make sense.

Thursday, 14 April 2016

Term one arts learning



Reflection of term one learning 
This term I have been learning about the elements of music so I can communicate to anyone from any culture, because music is a universal language. To show this learning I created a soundscape based on a poem I wrote. 
I believe my soundscape is relational because I made a beat out of a base drum, a rhythm out of a shaker which represented the beaches creaking and rubbing against each other, an ostinato out of two clangers which represents the rebuild of Christchurch, and it all connects to my poem.
Overall I think this term has taught me a lot about the musical arts and all its properties.






Christchurch is my home.

Beside me
branches 
sway in the cool wind 
Left-right-left-right.

dew 
drips,
from the big oaks, 
landing on top
of the neighbors roof.

On the road,
a car's 
exhaust pipe 
pumps out dust,
from behind, 
polluting
the fresh air. 

I reach out in front of me,
and touch the
moist
wood of the fence. 

The otakaro
river runs
through Christchurch,
-  cold and wet.

At the beach,
my brother and I 
dive
into the waves,
on a hot summer's day
the water is brisk.

Christchurch is my home.

By Casper 

Here is a link to my soundscape of the poem you just read.

Wednesday, 30 March 2016

Christchurch

Christchurch is my home.

Beside me
branches 
sway in the cool wind 
Left-right-left-right.

Behind me 
dew 
drips,
from the big oaks, 
landing on top
of the neighbors roof.

On the road,
a car's 
exhaust pipe 
pumps out dust,
from behind, 
polluting
the fresh air. 

I reach out in front of me,
and touch the
moist
wood of the fence. 

The otakaro
river runs
through Christchurch,
-  cold and wet.

At the beach,
my brother and I 
dive
into the waves,
on a hot summer's day
the water is brisk.

Christchurch is my home.

By Casper 

Tuesday, 8 March 2016

Rabbit

The rabbit is a statue,
glaring intently with locked eyes,
staring with a confused look, as he waits. 

The natural instinct of stay or run weighs him down.
The grass is a dancer,
 swaying in the never ending routine of back and forward.

The sky is an octopus, 
changing from brilliant blue to a dark grey color, 
Why is everything in grey?
What is the rabbit thinking?
What does he see through his eyes?


Reflection.
I think that I'm on multistructural for my ekfrastic poem because I can share examples of metaphor that apply to the poem, eg.
-The grass is a dancer, swaying in the never ending routine of  back and forward.
-The rabbit is a statue, glaring intently with locked eyes.
-The sky is an octopus, changing from a brilliant blue to a dark grey color.